Author Topic: Figure 91, Page 84 Not labeled correctly for ladder working height  (Read 11107 times)

wahu22

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My understanding is that OSHA defines the working length of the ladder as the length of the ladder from the foot of the ladder to the upper (or top) support:

1926.1053(b)(5)(i) Non-self-supporting ladders shall be used at
an angle such that the horizontal distance from the top support
to the foot of the ladder is approximately one-quarter of the
working length of the ladder (the distance along the ladder
between the foot and the top support).

The way it is usually shown is with the distance between the base of the ladder to the wall as "L/4", and the ladder rails from the feet to the upper support point as "L".
 
Your description above figure 91 is correct in the first sentence of the paragraph.  But, the next sentence beginning with "For example,...) is incorrect because it says that "the base of the ladder should be one-quarter the height, or 4 ft away from the building."  This is not correct.  A correct statement would be "the base of the ladder should be one-quarter the working distance "L", or in this case 4 ft away from the building."  If the "L= 16 ft" is correctly labeled as the real working length of the ladder (along the rails of the ladder up to the top support,) and not the height of the building.

wahu22

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Re: Figure 91, Page 84 Not labeled correctly for ladder working height
« Reply #1 on: March 22, 2012, 07:18:57 PM »
I have another issue with Figure 91.  Normally, OSHA shows the tie-off point as at the top (or upper) support point of the ladder, not at a column next to the ladder near the top of the 3' extension above the ladder.  It would be clearer to show this the same way that OSHA does, and not to imply that a ladder is normally tied-off a couple of feet above the top support point of the ladder...  Which would not normally be as safe. Maybe this could work for some situations as in the Figure, but it is not the norm.